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20130224
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
was only a lieutenant the last 3 months and i found out if you google me under lieutenant you find something. i stick with sergeant because i have about 14 years on google for that. i spent about 28 years as a police officer for the city of san bernardino, california, about 80 miles outside los angeles. among other things i'm recognized as an expert on graffiti in california superior court. without reading all this i want to let you know that i am well rounded, i was supervisor of the unit to be supervisor of a multi agency dealing with it to being executive director for the entire state, california graffiti association of california. so i have a fair amount of background. i first became involved in graffiti back in 1991 when i was told in the gang unit that i was going to be a two-week assignment to deal with these guys called taggers. i continued until i retired so it was a long two weeks. a lot of times cities don't understand how deep the issue goes. i have had my card handed out, this is my phone number. i have absolutely no problem with people calling me any time to disc
would be eric schmidt meeting with the founders of google up there. that would reportedly one of the big factors. what is it that makes burning man such a haven for that kind of connection?
had been making the point that so much of the tech industry is project-based learning. google gives people time off to do what they want. they give them time to explore and hang out with other people, outside of the framework of this more structured enterprise. burning man, from the very beginning is project-based learning. it attracts people from every demographic that you can think of, every category. so you have to, potentially, encyclopedic knowledge assembled at this place. and the natural way to learn is project-based. scholarship is fine, academic models can be useful for certain things, but human beings tend to learn by engaging in project- based learning. if you look at the desert -- well, here is an example. i was on a tour for the black rock arts foundation. we went to various studios around the area where artwork was getting ready for la playa. all of the big ones involving armies of people with the various skills. it takes her attacker, a traditional art, overlapping fields of knowledge -- takes tech, traditional art, overlapping fields of knowledge. even people who we
to google search and put in, you know, hot girl, graffiti girl, we have one that has -- a picture -- was it your presentation that had the picture of the girl with that tagging on the side of her? there's tons of that out there. just grab one. just drop it out where her face ain't showing. once they see that picture right there, woo, i like it. you're going to get more and more that way. you also get some other things that go along with that. okay. we had a 56 year old man try to pick me up. [laughter] >> he's like, really like your tattoo. like really? so, i sent him over to icac, internet crimes against children and they worked him and got him to deal with his thing. but you will see some different things on here. the greatest thing, though, is using this for you to help combat the graffiti. again, the biggest part is to use it for -- any of my templates, take my name out thereof and send it that way, okay. i'll probably take it out for you when i send it to you, but anything we can do to combat this graffiti, by all means, i'm here. * i have a passion for it now. it's a lot of
this week-long exercise. and then you can also google this and there's a lot of different social news stories online that can provide the information as well. thank you very much. (applause). >> all right, that's our panel. we're going to take a break right now, just a short break for 10 minutes, and the lunch is just like yesterday, lunch is going to be dropped at the tables and then everybody come back and we'll start with our next panel discussion, it's a working lunch, and the panelists i'm sure they will be circulating so if you have some questions for them, please feel free to approach them. thank you very much for joining us, admiral. (applause). from secretaries and generals to marin county search and rescue over there to nert members, it's a great mix of people and i think that integration is crucial because when we're preparing before during and after a disaster response, everyone in this room has a role to play in one way or another. and it's a great mix. and having been a former fire fighter this topic is important to me. when you think about one point, 1 million fire f
systems. like google earth, yahoo maps. microsoft. those are examples of on line mapping systems that can be used to find businesses or get driving directions or check on traffic conditions. all digital maps. >> gis is used in the city of san francisco to better support what departments do. >> you imagine all the various elements of a city including parcels and the critical infrastructure where the storm drains are. the city access like the traffic lights and fire hydrants. anything you is represent in a geo graphic space with be stored for retrieval and analysis. >> the department of public works they maintain what goes on in the right-of-way, looking to dig up the streets to put in a pipe. with the permit. with mapping you click on the map, click on the street and up will come up the nchgz that will help them make a decision. currently available is sf parcel the assessor's application. you can go to the assessor's website and bring up a map of san francisco you can search by address and get information about any place in san francisco. you can search by address and find incidents of
companies like google and apple and facebook with incredible growth. in san francisco, mayor lee has welcomed to the fold in twitter, zynga, companies that are into cloud computing, hiring lots of people that not only want to live and work in the valley but recognize san francisco as being part of the valley. we are, indeed, fortunate, from san jose to san francisco, to be part of the innovation economy. we are finally seeing once again california's innovation is leading us out of the last three years of recession. i do not know about you but i am pretty tired of the recession. i made a statement several years ago that it was about time for an adjustment to the economy, things were too expensive, overheated. two years after that, i regretted making that comment. it was great to hear jim say when you look at education, you look at the programs, traveling around the world, that there is one constant. there are people and technology that say this is a place they want to be. entrepreneurs say this is where they want to be. when companies like facebook are started at an institution like h
will bing or google her, whatever your preferences, and learn more about our company. the silicon valley leadership group did a soft launch in january of something we call start-up silicon valley. it is for innovation economy, ceo's in this region to join at the leadership group basically for free. because we want to capture in the them to the dna that david packard, our founder had, which was a balance of running, brilliance, dynamic companies while, at the same time, being deeply engaged in your communities and in the quality of life of your employees. that is the scale that we want to raise up in these incredibly innovative young entrepreneurs. we have about 20 of them here in the audience today. i want to just mention three of them and embarrass them. they do not know i am going to do this. all of these at this in common. they have less than 40 employees currently. their business has been around for less than four years. and, like me, they are younger than 40 years old. [laughter] why are you laughing? [laughter] let me introduce the ceo of snoozie. stand. [applause] the ceo of good
. they can stay out of google. she's award winning reporter and covered california schools for 14 years and knows a lot about this subject and was honored by the california teacher association and received the highest award about the growing number of homeless students in the school system. she is a san francisco native and was in the peace corps and tout in west africa and please welcome jill tucker. [applause] >> thank you. she just dated me with that 9090 peace corps thing. okay. i want to say how great it is to be here. i have been looking at everyone's name tags and awed by the wide variety of people and i want you to in rolodex. email me. there are great stories i have been hearing today. we have amazing and large panel and it is an honor to moderate for them. real quickly you will have to take my word. i have read their full bios which are three pages here. i'm not going to read all of that but you have to my word these are award winning policy makers and leaders in our community. we will start with jeff rosen. [applause] he's the district attorney of santa clara county
, it is a matter of perspective, i mean the appellant is showing you a google map, pictures. from space satellites, i am showing you the pictures that were taken from the deck and i can eye those decks, those adjacent decks and i can tell you that they are similar in size and that they do extend to the rear yard and so we are not asking for anything that our adjacent neighbors don't already have. and it is, you know, it is... we are basically reconfiguring. and so those square footages that i am siting in my brief that i am stating that the existing mass of the deck and the stairs is 406 square feet and the proposed mass of the deck and the stairs is 469 square feet. what does it matter if it is a deck or a stair to the appellant? they can't even see them. she has got a 20 and a half foot blank wall and we are set back at least 8 feet from that and the proposed deck and we are only going two feet further closer to her blank wall. so i don't understand the concern that she has other than you know we did have a meeting with her and we did, state what i thought was a very effective approach to her co
, you can look online, you can google it, it's called the next generation incident command system or nics. it's a command and control web-based tool that we're looking with mit lincoln labs and dss and i would foresee when we stand up our wing operation center at miramar that the marine corps liaison and the navy liaison and if need be the guard liaison would have access to that tool. the next generation command system is a fantastic web-based command and control technology that we expect to use in the future. with that, thank you. >> thanks. colonel yeager. >> i just want to say you can't underestimate the risk presented by these environments we fly in and really the relationships that we build with cal fire and the training prepares us to mitigate that risk. as rear admiral riveras said, bad things tend it happen at night. they also happen on the weekend and i think we have a 3-day week jepld here but i assure you we are ready to respond. >> from personal experience in 2007, i started training for fire fighting in 2006 but in 2007 was my first actual experience fighting fi
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)